Mathematical field of topology reveals importance of ‘holes in brain’

New Scientist article: Applying the mathematical field of topology to brain science suggests gaps in densely connected brain regions serve essential cognitive functions. Newly discovered densely connected neural groups are characterized by a gap in the center, with one edge of the ring (cycle) being very thin. It’s speculated that this architecture evolved to enable the brain to better time and sequence the integration of information from different functional areas into a coherent pattern.

Aspects of the findings appear to support Edelman’s and Tononi’s (2000, p. 83) theory of neuronal group selection (TNGS, aka neural Darwinism).


Edelman, G.M. and Tononi, G. (2000). A Universe of Consciousness: How Matter Becomes Imagination. Basic Books.

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Paul Watson
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Paul Watson

The brain topology “mind the gaps” article is a very good read. Probably the primary reason for segregation of specialized information processing units in the brain is to avoid confusing cross-talk, as stated in the article. Also mentioned briefly in the article, this separation makes it easier to control which brain areas are interacting at any given time. This in turn not only controls the direction of unconscious information processing, but greatly affects your moment-to-moment conscious reality, including felt sensations, felt emotions, and felt thoughts. Having limited and specific pathways linking neuronal functional groups that could, in principle, get involved… Read more »