Edward Berge

  • Good, brief clip on the difference between the above, and how meditation can turn altered states into lasting traits that one carries in their daily life. Aside from the physiological benefits, if we can just dump […]

  • A point of debate is the tension of synergy and autonomy. The presentation highlights a loss of autonomy for the parts in a synergy. But it doesn’t address the new autonomy created for the parts given their interpenetrating symbiosis. By uploading some of the responsibilities required to maintain autonomy at the lower level onto the system, this…[Read more]

  • Very interesting, short video on how evolution relies on synergy, the forming of new organisms by teaming up with others. It also applies to how synergy leads to social organization. An enticing quote: “It […]

    • A point of debate is the tension of synergy and autonomy. The presentation highlights a loss of autonomy for the parts in a synergy. But it doesn’t address the new autonomy created for the parts given their interpenetrating symbiosis. By uploading some of the responsibilities required to maintain autonomy at the lower level onto the system, this frees up that energy to direct in more innovation explorations for those parts. Something lost, something gained.

    • Something biologically synergistic is, by definition (?), very fitness-enhancing, on average for the organism(s) involved. I’ll look at this and probably mostly agree. Except that what ultimately judges whether any new association or developmental novelty (e.g., environmentally induced) is synergistic? What process tunes it to be even more synergistic? Answer: Natural Selection. — PJW

  • Ok, maybe not. The article’s specialized jargon and information is beyond my ability to comprehend, let alone connect to my speculations.

    As to your questions Paul, I’m not familiar with Edelman’s work. I do though think that our limbic-based ‘values’ are akin to Damasio’s proto-self and form the basis of ‘higher’ cognitive functions. So there…[Read more]

  • eNeuro, 10 March 2017, 4(2). This might be neuroscientific evidence for my speculations on the syntegration of consciousness states and stages via meditative discipline. To be determined. The a […]

    • Ed, Tell me what you think about the idea that limbic system based “value systems” (sensu Edelman) that keep track of of close fitness-related needs, ultimately are in control of interaction between brain regions (in developmental time and real time)? Perhaps this is true for both the regions participating in the “reentry” processes that may underlie conscious thought/experience, as well as unconscious information processing. Either way, these limbic regulatory mechanisms would have a lot of control over our “adaptively subjective dream world.

    • Ok, maybe not. The article’s specialized jargon and information is beyond my ability to comprehend, let alone connect to my speculations.

      As to your questions Paul, I’m not familiar with Edelman’s work. I do though think that our limbic-based ‘values’ are akin to Damasio’s proto-self and form the basis of ‘higher’ cognitive functions. So there is certainly some bottom-up influence going on. But I also think that our higher functions via the PFC can also influence our basic instincts, so to speak, via top-down causation. I provided a number of citations to that effect in the recent thread on consciousness.

  • Authors from Princeton, Dartmouth and Exeter published this. The abstract:

    “Though some warnings about online “echo chambers” have been hyperbolic, tendencies toward selective exposure to politically cong […]

  • Of course the series’ explanation of consciousness is a lot more complex than the above might seem to indicate. The following video explains a lot of the season finale’s attempt to tie together the series themes, a major one being consciousness. It was one of the creator’s (Arnold’s) plan all along to have the hosts achieve consciousness, which…[Read more]

  • A scene from Westworld below. Hopkins, one of the creators of the robot ‘hosts,’ discusses consciousness with a host who newly discovers what he is.

    • Of course the series’ explanation of consciousness is a lot more complex than the above might seem to indicate. The following video explains a lot of the season finale’s attempt to tie together the series themes, a major one being consciousness. It was one of the creator’s (Arnold’s) plan all along to have the hosts achieve consciousness, which Ford (Hopkins) eventually accepts and works further to induce. Ford built a host modeled on Arnold, the latter who figures out (5:25) that consciousness is not a pyramid like linear structure upward but one of folding inward. Hence the recurring symbol of the maze throughout the series, indicative of the hosts’, and perhaps even humanity’s, evolutionary process to achieving consciousness.

    • See this post for some of my ruminations on what ‘folding in’ entails for consciousness.

      http://integralpostmetaphysics.ning.com/forum/topics/states-stages-the-wc-lattice-and-the-fold?commentId=5301756%3AComment%3A68407

  • In this FB post, copied below. The first podcast can be found here.

    “By popular demand, it’s the FrameLab Podcast — a podcast about politics, language, and your brain.
    In Episode 1, [I] discuss the con […]

  • And implies an event horizon of the human brain. There’s a mouthful, a new title in NeuroQuantology (15:3, September 2017). The abstract follows, also a brainful. This will take some reading and digesting, pro […]

  • I haven’t viewed this video yet, just saw it. It’s relevant to the topic though. The blurb:

    Author Jeremy Lent discusses the moral complexities arising from the possibilities of human genetic enhancement, in this talk given to the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Sonoma State University, September 26, 2017.

    The affluent echelons of society…[Read more]

  • In this 20-minute video Jeremy Lent gives a brief introduction into his system of liology, his response to substance dualism. Conventional science maintains this dualism, so it is up to the ecological science of […]

  • Thanks for the promotion, hopefully leading to some propagation.

  • One can find Evan Thompson’s 6-part video series on the topic at the link below.

    From part 1, quoting William James: “Effort of attention is thus the essential phenomenon of will” (7:10). From the conclusion of part 6: “Free will then is not exempt from causes and conditions but is rather the flexible coordination of attention” (4:05). In part…[Read more]

  • You can read some excerpts of Tse’s The Neural Basis of Free Will at the following Project Muse link. From the section on readiness potentials:

    “Here I argue that conscious feelings of willing or agency are not central to understanding the neural basis of free will. Simple actions, such as repeatedly lifting a finger, or even complex actions,…[Read more]

  • “Neural antecedents of spontaneous voluntary movement: A new perspective.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 2016.

    “Now a series of new developments has begun to unravel what we thought we knew about the brain activity preceding SVMs. The main new revelation is that the apparent build-up of this activity, up until about 200 ms pre-movement, may…[Read more]

  • “Free will and neuroscience: From explaining freedom away to new ways of operationalizing and measuring it.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2016. Abstract:

    “The concept of free will is hard to define, but crucial to both individual and social life. For centuries people have wondered how freedom is possible in a world ruled by physical…[Read more]

  • The article states: “It is only the personal narrative, we argue, that is accompanied by personal awareness.” This flies in the face of a lot of neuroscientific work by for example Antonio Damasio, which posits a proto-self, a core self and an autobiographical self (akin to the ‘personal narrative’ above). And all of which have personal awareness.…[Read more]

  • Is there a T.R.U.M.P. brain? Nov.-Dec. 2017 issue of Porto Biomedical Journal (2:6). The abstract:

    “Neuroscientists have begun to investigate whether different political attitudes are associated with specific mind-brain markers. In this article, we build on political neuroscience research to briefly illustrate the structure and function of a…[Read more]

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